Saturday, 4 June 2011

Interruptions - a hindrance or a help to learning?

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http://creativestarlearning.co.uk/general-commentary/interruptions-a-hindrance-or-a-help-to-learning/

8 comments:

Caro said...

Juliet. This is a truly wonderful and important post. What you have written has really touched me. I too have grown impatient with the prescriptive nature of modern life. I constantly suggest to my children that they stop, listen, smell, look around. no matter the bird you were studying has flown away. Instead you have found its nest and the beauty of the tree in which it rested. Thank you SO much. much love Caro

Kierna C said...

What a great piece Juliet - although I find it much easier to deal with distractions outside too. I was just thinking about this the other day, I seem to feel that I have to be in 'teacher mode' when inside but can be more free outside to just enjoy where the children are going with things! Maybe it's a combination of getting more secure in your own skin and outdoor learning being the best way to go?

child central station said...

Amazing piece, great insights, thanks for sharing. Sometimes I think of interruptions, especially when the children find something of interest as just a different agenda. It is so important that we follow their lead and explore what is to be explored.

Juliet Robertson said...

Thanks for the nice feedback. I think it's been on my mind a lot recently in that I've been doing much more outdoor learning work with classes than usual in recent weeks.

I think it is being comfortable about where one is as a teacher - not in terms of place but mindset. Being able to go with the flow helps. Also, because I always ensure a feedback or plenary session at the end of an activity we can review what happened, why and how we all managed to deal with this. I think this can help children develop resilience and acceptance of things that just happen.

tomsensori said...

Nice post, Juliet. So often we have a teacher agenda that leaves no room for the real give and take of the education of us all, teachers and students alike. I think what you are saying is leave room for what you can't control. There will be less frustration, less power struggles and more learning.

Juliet Robertson said...

YES! Thanks Tom for expressing this so succinctly!

Pam said...

I agree- great post! I also think as we get more comfortable with our own teaching style (and get to the point that we don't feel we need to defend every little thing) we tend to relax a bit and go with the flow of the interuptions- whether they are inside or out!

wondersofnature said...

I too used to find interruptions a terrible intrusion, I would become overprotective of my pupils and their session time(I work mainly 1:1). Slowly over the last few years I too have come to value interactions with others whilst we are working outdoors-now they invariably add something to the session. Even if its just an observation by me of how my pupil reacts to something/someone.

What changed?-My confidence in my ability as a practitioner, and the trust that if a pupil interacted with something then they 'needed' to. Plus the acceptance that although I might want to make a perfect space and time for my pupils I was trying to create something that rarely exists and that we all have to make the most of what we have, where we are, in that moment...