Saturday, 10 March 2012

Wild about this space

This post has moved to a new location
http://creativestarlearning.co.uk/developing-school-grounds-outdoor-spaces/wild-about-this-space/

8 comments:

Kierna C said...

What a wonderful space to have within walking distance - even if it is quite a trek. It is great to see how the children are using every inch of the space & I love the idea of the older children helping to set up the rope area. Kierna

Juliet Robertson said...

Hi Kierna

Yes - the older children have been really helpful. I'm not able to be at school for the next two weeks owing to conferences, etc. However the routine is now in place and the older children know how to set up a rope area and build dens which means a supply teacher should manage.

The children do use every inch of the space and more! They are a very physical bunch of kids and need the freedom to run, shout and move about. The tensions experienced in the classroom seem to dissipate here. I've also observed much more positive social interactions and less negative ones. The children speak more and engage in some very good role play which is lovely to see.

Celeste said...

I get inspired by your posts! It is wonderful to see experiences like yours in education!
Celeste

Juliet Robertson said...

Thanks Celeste

Luckily I think slowly more practitioners are trying to provide this. In Scotland there is an expectation that all practitioners will provide frequent regular opportunities for children and young people to learn outside.

So here's to many more actually doing this!

Sheryl @ Teaching 2 and 3 Year Olds said...

This is wonderful!

Tom Bedard said...

Yesterday I drove by a corporate child care center and noticed the tree on their playground. It was a large, shiny, plastic tree that only allowed the children to crawl through a hole in the "trunk." (No climbing, that is for the plastic climber.) And the tree was surrounded by fake grass. I was struck with the sterility of that tree compared to the ones pictured here. Yes, I immediately thought of your post which I had read earlier in the day. Sterile tree equals sterile play. Natural tree equals natural play. I can tell you which equation I prefer.

markgreenplay said...

What a fab space, full of opportunities, as well as moments of shade and privacy. And every play space should have logs like these!

Juliet Robertson said...

Hi Tom - your response is interesting and the fake tree is quite symbolic of how estranged our society has become in some instances from nature and all things nature.