Wednesday, 31 August 2011

U is for Up and Up and Up

This post has moved to a new location
http://creativestarlearning.co.uk/outdoor-play/u-is-for-up-and-up-and-up/

12 comments:

Kierna C said...

Love it Juliet - my fondest memories in Norway are of children just sitting way up in trees enjoying the peace & quiet.

Sarah said...

I've only just found your blog! LOVE it!!

As a teacher from the US public school system, tree climbing is off limits on the playground. While I was teaching in Norway, I LOVED how it was accepted. I thought it made so much sense to allow them to climb and explore! They learn so much through the experience!!! Thank you!!

Deborah (Teach Preschool) said...

What an incredibly fun lesson! Hmmmm, we have a few trees in our yard!

Ayn Colsh said...

Tree climbing was one of my favorite past times as a child! I wish we were allowed here in the U.S. (maybe even just our region).I'm waiting for the pendulum to swing again and more folks will understand the value of this type of play!

Roses - Mama Magic said...

I wish there was a 'super like' button that I could click on!
Grew up climbing trees, loved the calm and adventure they offered. Did almost break my back once, but was fine the next day. By the time we turned ten, we knew every tree, leaves, fruits, birds, wild-life, wood type (firm /soft/ breakable) and fragrance associted with them. What a lovely hands-on way!

Juliet Robertson said...

I think tree climbing symbolises the freedom of our childhoods - let's not take this away from children in our care!

Scott said...

My favorite part of this post: "The staff recognise and understand that children rarely put themselves in a situation where they feel uncomfortable or unsafe."

I think this thinking could be applied in lots of things for kids. Let's let them take a few risks - they know their limits. (And let's respect them when they communicate they are uncomfortable with something - and let them decline to do it.)

Thanks for a thought-provoking post, Juliet.

Sherry and Donna said...

I LOVE how the staff are standing back from the tree instead of hovering underneath waiting for this capable young climber to fall. They are sending her a valuable lesson in trust! ... Beautiful post Juliet!
Donna :) :)

KAREN GREEN said...

Children should never be denied the opportunity to climb trees... surely this should be a natural right of passage through childhood. At the far end of my grandfathers backyard there were 3 enormous willow trees, one each for three little girl cousins. We loved our willow trees. We each sat perched in our trees, talking across the space between them to each other for what seemed like an eternity. As adults, we all remember our willow trees long after they, and our grandfather have passed on.

Males in Early Childhood said...

"Children rarely put themselves in a situation where they feel uncomfortable or unsafe." That is one of the wisest things I have heard/read.
:):)

ChildsPlayMusicPerth said...

I've just found your blog and I love it! I think this is a great post and I too believe that "Children rarely put themselves in a situation where they feel uncomfortable or unsafe."

I spent much of my childhood climbing trees and I'm so angry that this natural part of childhood has become frowned on or even forbidden. Children need to take calculated risks and if we give them the opportunity they surprise us with how sensibly they behave.

I had my share of minor falls, I got scrapes and splinters, I once got stuck and had to be helped down by my father, but the lessons I learned from tree-climbing were priceless: think before you act; plan your progress; test the branch before you put your weight on it; never be afraid to ask for help when you need it; keep going and reach your goals even when it is hard and scary; anything that is worth doing involves risks, and learning to manage those risks is part of life. You learn far more from climbing trees than just how to climb.

Keep on playing!

Alec Duncan

Juliet Robertson said...

Thanks Alec - there is indeed a lot of life lessons that can be linked to tree climbing.